Confidence games
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Confidence games lawyers, accountants, and the tax shelter industry by Tanina Rostain

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  • 4 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Corporations,
  • Taxation,
  • Law and legislation,
  • Tax shelters,
  • History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementTanina Rostain and Milton C. Regan, Jr
ContributionsRegan, Milton C.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHJ4653.T38 R67 2014
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 408 pages
Number of Pages408
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27218480M
ISBN 100262529777, 0262027135
ISBN 109780262529778, 9780262027137
LC Control Number2013034776
OCLC/WorldCa861966361

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Maria Konnikova is the author of Mastermind and The Confidence is a regular contributing writer for The New Yorker, and has written for the Atlantic, the New York Times, Slate, the New Republic, the Paris Review, the Wall Street Journal, Salon, the Boston Globe, the Scientific American MIND, WIRED, and graduated from Harvard University Cited by: 2. Brain Pickings participates in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn commissions by linking to Amazon. In more human terms, this means that whenever you buy a book on Amazon from a link on here, I receive a small percentage of its price. Insightful and gripping, the book brings readers into the world of the con, examining the relationship between artist and victim. The Confidence Game asks not only why we believe con artists, but also examines the very act of believing and how our sense of truth can be manipulated by those around us. Maria Konnikova has written a compelling, engrossing account of the world of the con. I stayed up far too late reading it. Beautifully written, and filled with stories and thought-provoking psychological research, The Confidence Game will teach you how confidence artists operate—and how to outwit them Frank W. Abagnale, subject of the movie, book, and .

Confidence Games book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Awash in a sea of data that seems to have no meaning and bombarded /5.   Maria Konnikova is the author of Mastermind and The Confidence is a regular contributing writer for The New Yorker, and has written for the Atlantic, the New York Times, Slate, the New Republic, the Paris Review, the Wall Street Journal, Salon, the Boston Globe, the Scientific American MIND, WIRED, and graduated from Harvard Brand: Penguin Publishing Group.   “The Confidence Game” belongs to the genre popularized by Malcolm Gladwell: social psychology designed for mass consumption. Typically, books of this sort are intended to be both useful and.   Summary of The Confidence Game by Maria Konnikova | Summary & Analysis. Preview. The Confidence Game is a nonfiction examination of con considers both the minds and methods of con artists and the minds and Pages:

Returning full circle to a version of the market first proposed by Adam Smith when he used theology and aesthetics to rethink economics, Confidence Games closes with a plea for a conception of life that embraces uncertainty and insecurity as signs of the openness of the future. Like religion and economics, life is a confidence game in which the. Terminology. Synonyms include con, confidence game, confidence scheme, ripoff, scam, and perpetrator of a confidence trick (or "con trick") is often referred to as a confidence (or "con") man, con-artist, or a "grifter".Samuel Thompson (–) was the original "confidence man". Thompson was a clumsy swindler who asked his victims to express .   While cheats and swindlers may be a dime a dozen, true conmen—the Bernie Madoffs, the Jim Bakkers, the Lance Armstrongs—are elegant, outsized personalities. Excerpt The Confidence Game. In , Stanford University psychologists Jonathan Freeman and Scott Fraser observed an interesting phenomenon in their experiments: someone who has already agreed to a small request—like opening the door for you—would become more, not less, likely to agree to a larger request later on.